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What a Wonderful World (piano solo) with lead sheet

What a Wonderful World (piano solo) with lead sheet

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Piano solo Sheet Music download.

What a Wonderful World” is a song written by Bob Thiele (as “George Douglas”) and George David Weiss. It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong and released in 1967 as a single, which topped the pop charts in the United Kingdom, though it performed poorly in the United States because Larry Newton, the president of ABC Records, disliked the song and refused to promote it.

After appearing in the film Good Morning, Vietnam, the song was re-released as a single in 1988, and it rose to number 32 on the Billboard Hot 100. Armstrong’s recording was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. The publishing for this song is controlled by Concord, BMG Rights Management and Carlin America.

The song was written by producer Bob Thiele (as “George Douglas“) and composer and performer George David Weiss.

One source claims the song was first offered to Tony Bennett, who turned it down, although Louis Armstrong biographer Ricky Riccardi disputes this claim. George Weiss recounts in the book Off the Record: Songwriters on Songwriting by Graham Nash that he wrote the song specifically for Louis Armstrong. Weiss was inspired by Armstrong’s ability to bring people of different races together.

Because he was gigging at the Tropicana Hotel, Armstrong recorded the song in Las Vegas at Bill Porter’s United Recording studio. The session was scheduled to follow Armstrong’s midnight show, and by 2 am the musicians were settled and tape was rolling. Arranger Artie Butler was there with songwriters Weiss and Thiele, and Armstrong was in the studio singing with the orchestra. Armstrong had recently signed to ABC Records, and ABC president Larry Newton showed up to photograph Armstrong. Newton wanted a swingy pop song like “Hello, Dolly!“, a big hit for Armstrong when he was with Kapp Records, so when Newton heard the slow pace of “What a Wonderful World”, he tried to stop the session. Newton was locked out of the studio for his disruption, but a second problem arose: nearby freight train whistles interrupted the session twice, forcing the recording to start over. Armstrong shook his head and laughed off the distractions, keeping his composure. The session ended around 6 am, going longer than expected. To make sure the orchestra members were paid extra for their overtime, Armstrong accepted only $250 musicians union scale for his work.

The song was not initially a hit in the United States, where it sold fewer than 1,000 copies because Newton did not like or promote it, but was a major success in the United Kingdom, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart. In the United States, the song hit No. 16 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Chart. It was also the biggest-selling single of 1968 in the UK where it was among the last pop singles issued by HMV before it became an exclusive classical music label. The song made Armstrong the oldest male to top the UK Singles Chart. Armstrong’s record was broken in 2009 when a remake of “Islands in the Stream” recorded for Comic Relief—which included the 68-year-old Tom Jones—reached number one in that chart.

ABC Records’ European distributor EMI forced ABC to issue a What a Wonderful World album in 1968 (catalogue number ABCS-650). It did not chart in the United States, due to ABC not promoting it, but charted in the UK where it was issued by Stateside Records with catalogue number SSL 10247 and peaked on the British chart at No. 37.

The song gradually became something of a standard and reached a new level of popularity. An episode of The Muppet Show produced in 1977 and broadcast early in 1978 featured Rowlf the Dog singing the song to a puppy. In 1978, it was featured in the closing scenes of BBC radio’s, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and was repeated for BBC’s 1981 TV adaptation of the series. In 1988, Armstrong’s recording appeared in the film Good Morning, Vietnam (despite the film being set in 1965 – two years before it was recorded) and was re-released as a single, hitting No. 32 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in February 1988. The single charted at number one for the fortnight ending June 27, 1988 on the Australian chart. It is also the closing song for the 1995 movie 12 Monkeys and the 1998 film adaptation of Madeline.

In 2001, rappers Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, and the Alchemist released “The Forest,” a song that begins with three lines of lyric adapted from “What a Wonderful World”, altered to become “an invitation to get high” on marijuana. The rappers and their record company, Sony Music Entertainment, were sued by the owners of “What a Wonderful World,” Abilene Music. The suit was thrown out of court after Judge Gerard E. Lynch determined that the altered lyric was a parody, transforming the uplifting original message to a new one with a darker nature.

By April 2014, Louis Armstrong’s 1967 recording had sold 2,173,000 downloads in the United States after it was released digitally.

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To make Jazz transcriptions can be a hard work and if you want to buy them, it may result quite a big amount of money. Find and download them from our Library! Quick and easy!

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Bill Evans, Keith Jarret, Thelonious Monk, Herbie Hanckok, Pat Metheny, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Chet Baker, Charles Mingus, Charlie Parker, Jacques Loussier, and many more sheet music transcriptions.

Autumn Leaves – as recorded by Bill Evans with sheet music transcription in our Library.

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The Contemporary Jazz Pianist, by Bill Dobbins, vol. 1 to 4

Table of Contents
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Bill Dobbins: A Comprehensive Approach to Keyboard Improvisation. Available at YOUR online Sheet Music Library.

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Bill Dobbins

Pianist Bill Dobbins is a professor of Jazz Studies and Contemporary Media at the Eastman School of Music. He has been the recipient of jazz composition grants from the Ohio Arts Council as well as the National Endowment for the Arts. Dobbins was instrumental in designing the graduate and undergraduate curricula for Eastman’s jazz studies program, and many of his students have become successful recording artists, having been heard in the big bands of Maynard Ferguson, Chuck Mangione, Buddy Rich, Count Basie, Woody Herman, Thad Jones/Mel Lewis, and Maria Schneider

Dobbins has performed and recorded with such jazz artists as Clark Terry, Al Cohn, Red Mitchell, Phil Woods, Bill Goodwin, Dave Liebman, Paquito D’Rivera, Peter Erskine, and John Goldsby.

This invaluable series is designed as a comprehensive method to help jazz pianists learn and refine their improvisation skills. The set covers topics including harmony, voicing, melody, rhythm, musical development, and various jazz styles, as well as providing transcribed solos for the students to study and imitate.

Contents

Volume 1 Chapter Contents: I. Diatonic Seventh Chords and Their Corresponding Modes II. Voicing the Five Basic Seventh Chord Types for the Left Hand III. Diatonic and Chromatic Embellishing Chords IV. Building a Chord Line for the Left Hand V. Basic Chord-Scale Relationships VI. Understanding Jazz Rhythm VII. Basic Principles of Accompaniment for the Left Hand VIII. Basic Principles of Harmonic Substitution IX. Diatonic Exercises X. Pentatonic Exercises XI. Diminished Exercises XII. Chromatic Exercises XIII. Melodic Embellishments XIV. Principles of Melodic Development XV. Special Effects XVI. Exercises for Beginning Improvisation XVII. Transcribed Solos XVIII. Tunes for Further Study Conclusion Appendices and Discography

Volume 2 Chapter Contents: I. Preface II. Two-hand Voicings III. Building a Tow-hand Chord Line IV. Two-hand Embellishing Chords V. Technics for Melody Harmonization VI. Blues in Major Keys VII. Blues in Minor Keys VIII. Rhythm Changes IX. Popular Song Forms X. Contemporary Ballad Styles XI. Jazz-Rock Styles XII. Contemporary Jazz Forms XIII. Free Jazz XIV. Comping XV. Improvisation as Communication Conclusion Discography

Volume 3 Chapter Contents: (Suggested listening follows each chapter) I. Stride Piano Styles: • Cantankerous Chromatics • Blues for Fats • Basie’s Beat • Blood Brother II. Boogie Woogie Piano Basie’s Boogie • Prickly Pete • Wobbly Waltz III. Gospel Piano Sanctified • I’m In His Hands • Holy Roller IV. Bebop Piano Styles A 624 • Red’s Blues • “T” Time • The Thing • Yardbird Conversation V. Solo Ballad Styles For Art’s Sake • Song for Bill Evans • Ballad VI. Harmonic Styles of • 1960’s and 1970’s Centrifuge • Waltz for Clare • Memories • Liberation VII. Latin and Ostinato • Styles of the 1970’s Autumn Song • Winter Song • Spring Song • Summer Song VIII. Free Jazz Bent • Vortex • Mobile • Anticipation Conclusion Appendix I Solo Piano Recordings of Interest Published Solo Piano Jazz Music Appendix II Published Solo Piano Jazz Music

Volume 4

All of you: Theme

Variation I – Scott Joplin
Variation II – Jelly Roll Morton
Variation III – James P .Johnson
Variation IV – Willie “the Lion” Smith
Variation V – Earl Hines
Variation VI – Fats Waller
Variation VII – Teddy Wilson
Variation VIII – Duke Ellington
Variation IX – Art Tatum
Variation X – Meade Lux Lewis
Variation XI – Pete Johnson
Variation XII – Jimmy Yancey
Variation XIII – Thelonious Monk
Variation XIV – Bud Powell
Variation XV – Oscar Peterson
Variation XVI – Erroll Garner
Variation XVII – Lennie Tristano
Variation XVIII – Bill Evans
Variation XIX – Clare Fischer
Variation XX – Jimmy Rowles
Variation XXI – Cecil Taylor
Variation XXII – Chick Corea
Variation XXIII – Keith Jarrett
Variation XXIV – Richie Beirach
Conclusion
Appendix
Discography

Preface of Volume 1

The true value of jazz lies in its ability to provide the musician with a means of expressing the absolute limits of his imagination within lhe framework of certain harmonic, melodic and rhythmic principles. These principles are voluntarily agreed to by the individual or by the members of a group, but they may vary a great deal depending on the style of jazz
which is being played.

In this respect playing jazz is quite similar to speaking a language. There are two essential directions in which the student of jaz.z must work if he is to master this new language. The first is academic study in the form of analysis and musical exercises. This is analogous LO the study of grammar and vocabulary.

The second is practical usage in the form of playing or experimenting
with other musicians and listening to live performances and recordings of professional musicians who have already mastered a mature jazz style. This is analogous to speaking the language with other students while learning proper pronunciation, context and colloquial expressions from the natives. Just as there arc different colloquial expressions and dialects in different regions of the country, there are distinct melodic and harmonic characteristics which define the various styles of Jazz.

The major difficulty facing the student is that of achieving the proper balance between the study of theoretical principles and the practical application of these principles to playing and improvising. A musician may play a scale as a technical exercise thousands of times, but be doesn’t really understand the scale until he can create melodies with it and construct harmonies from it. At the same time, a musician might search for months, by ear, for a melody which is compatible with a given chord when, by applying a simple principle of chord-scale relationships, he could invent a number of appropriate melodies in a matter of minutes.

It is, therefore, extremely important that the mind and the ear be developed equally. The ear must be equipped to use the mind’s information with good musical sense, while the mind must be equipped to lead the ear into unexplored territory and suggest new musical possibilities. To best achieve this important balance, a musician with only minimal understanding of theory and harmony must emphasize this size of his development until he understands the theoretical basis for what he
hears.

Likewise, a musician with a poorly developed musical ear must emphasize ear training and listening until he can use his theoretical knowledge in a truly musical way.

Leading the analogy of improvised music and language to its logical conclusion, it may be said that the principles of Jazz improvisation reach the highest level of creative expression when a musician plays jazz as naturally as he speaks his native language. A musician who can only recreate someone else’s music is like a language student who can read clomics of French literature without being able to express his own ideas with that same vocabulary. He has the intellectual knowledge but no real
depth of understanding.

Improvisation provides the musician with a personal and vital experience in the laws of harmony, melody and rhythm. As in the study of a language, where the student’s basic vocabulary is largely determined by his principal teacher, the jazz player begins acquiring his vocabulary by imitating established artists. He later uses the same basic vocabulary in a more personal mode of expression. Finally, he may expand the vocabulary as he wishes until his style becomes largely his own. Few players reach this level of development but the possibilities arc limitless.

Within this text I have attempted to outline a method of study which will ultimately enable the student 10 think for himself and to make musical decisions in an intelligent way. This book should be no more than a point of departure. When the material has really been absorbed the student should be able to extend what is here rather than merely conforming 10 it. That is the point at which real creativity begins, and the only limitations
are the imagination and curiosity of the student.

Keith Jarrett – Tokyo Solo 2002 Encores

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Good lesson for Jazz amateurs!

Based on the Standard Fly me to the Moon lead sheet.

Good lesson for Jazz amateurs!

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Jazz sheet music download.

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Jazz Play Along: Herbie Hancock “Watermelon Man”

Jazz Play Along: Herbie Hancock “Watermelon Man” with sheet music

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Play Guitar with U2 (1984-1987) – “With Or Without You” audio background play along (sheet music)

Play Guitar with U2 (1984-1987) – “With Or Without You” audio background play along (sheet music) – Play Along Guitar

play guitar along with u2

Sheet Music Download.

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Jazz & Rock Play Along

What a Wonderful World (piano solo) with lead sheet

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What a Wonderful World (piano solo) with lead sheet

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Piano solo Sheet Music download.

What a Wonderful World” is a song written by Bob Thiele (as “George Douglas”) and George David Weiss. It was first recorded by Louis Armstrong and released in 1967 as a single, which topped the pop charts in the United Kingdom, though it performed poorly in the United States because Larry Newton, the president of ABC Records, disliked the song and refused to promote it.

After appearing in the film Good Morning, Vietnam, the song was re-released as a single in 1988, and it rose to number 32 on the Billboard Hot 100. Armstrong’s recording was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999. The publishing for this song is controlled by Concord, BMG Rights Management and Carlin America.

The song was written by producer Bob Thiele (as “George Douglas“) and composer and performer George David Weiss.

One source claims the song was first offered to Tony Bennett, who turned it down, although Louis Armstrong biographer Ricky Riccardi disputes this claim. George Weiss recounts in the book Off the Record: Songwriters on Songwriting by Graham Nash that he wrote the song specifically for Louis Armstrong. Weiss was inspired by Armstrong’s ability to bring people of different races together.

Because he was gigging at the Tropicana Hotel, Armstrong recorded the song in Las Vegas at Bill Porter’s United Recording studio. The session was scheduled to follow Armstrong’s midnight show, and by 2 am the musicians were settled and tape was rolling. Arranger Artie Butler was there with songwriters Weiss and Thiele, and Armstrong was in the studio singing with the orchestra. Armstrong had recently signed to ABC Records, and ABC president Larry Newton showed up to photograph Armstrong. Newton wanted a swingy pop song like “Hello, Dolly!“, a big hit for Armstrong when he was with Kapp Records, so when Newton heard the slow pace of “What a Wonderful World”, he tried to stop the session. Newton was locked out of the studio for his disruption, but a second problem arose: nearby freight train whistles interrupted the session twice, forcing the recording to start over. Armstrong shook his head and laughed off the distractions, keeping his composure. The session ended around 6 am, going longer than expected. To make sure the orchestra members were paid extra for their overtime, Armstrong accepted only $250 musicians union scale for his work.

The song was not initially a hit in the United States, where it sold fewer than 1,000 copies because Newton did not like or promote it, but was a major success in the United Kingdom, reaching number one on the UK Singles Chart. In the United States, the song hit No. 16 on the Billboard Bubbling Under Chart. It was also the biggest-selling single of 1968 in the UK where it was among the last pop singles issued by HMV before it became an exclusive classical music label. The song made Armstrong the oldest male to top the UK Singles Chart. Armstrong’s record was broken in 2009 when a remake of “Islands in the Stream” recorded for Comic Relief—which included the 68-year-old Tom Jones—reached number one in that chart.

ABC Records’ European distributor EMI forced ABC to issue a What a Wonderful World album in 1968 (catalogue number ABCS-650). It did not chart in the United States, due to ABC not promoting it, but charted in the UK where it was issued by Stateside Records with catalogue number SSL 10247 and peaked on the British chart at No. 37.

The song gradually became something of a standard and reached a new level of popularity. An episode of The Muppet Show produced in 1977 and broadcast early in 1978 featured Rowlf the Dog singing the song to a puppy. In 1978, it was featured in the closing scenes of BBC radio’s, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, and was repeated for BBC’s 1981 TV adaptation of the series. In 1988, Armstrong’s recording appeared in the film Good Morning, Vietnam (despite the film being set in 1965 – two years before it was recorded) and was re-released as a single, hitting No. 32 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in February 1988. The single charted at number one for the fortnight ending June 27, 1988 on the Australian chart. It is also the closing song for the 1995 movie 12 Monkeys and the 1998 film adaptation of Madeline.

In 2001, rappers Ghostface Killah, Raekwon, and the Alchemist released “The Forest,” a song that begins with three lines of lyric adapted from “What a Wonderful World”, altered to become “an invitation to get high” on marijuana. The rappers and their record company, Sony Music Entertainment, were sued by the owners of “What a Wonderful World,” Abilene Music. The suit was thrown out of court after Judge Gerard E. Lynch determined that the altered lyric was a parody, transforming the uplifting original message to a new one with a darker nature.

By April 2014, Louis Armstrong’s 1967 recording had sold 2,173,000 downloads in the United States after it was released digitally.

Categories
Jazz & Rock Play Along

Jazz Play Along: Laurie by Bill Evans (with sheet music)

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Jazz Play Along: Laurie by Bill Evans (with sheet music)

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Jazz Play Along Bill Evans Time Remembered background music with sheet music

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Jazz Play Along Bill Evans Time Remembered background music with sheet music

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“Laura ” Jazz Play Along with sheet music

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Play Jazz Standards!

“Laura ” Jazz Play Along with sheet music.

“Laura” is a 1945 popular song. The music, composed by David Raksin for the 1944 movie Laura, which starred Gene Tierney and Dana Andrews, is heard frequently in the movie. The film’s director, Otto Preminger, had originally wanted to use Duke Ellington‘s “Sophisticated Lady” as the theme, but Raksin was not convinced that it was suitable. Angered, Preminger gave Raksin one weekend to compose an alternative melody. Raksin later said, and maintained for the rest of his days, that when, over that weekend, his wife sent him a “Dear John” letter, the haunting theme seemed to write itself.

Laura is the face in the misty light, footsteps that you hear down the hall
The laugh that floats on the summer night that you can never quite recall
And you see Laura on a train that is passing through, those eyes how familiar they seem
She gave your very first kiss to you, that was Laura but she’s only a dream

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The song became a jazz standard and has been recorded over 400 times. Some of the best-known versions are by Woody Herman, Dave Brubeck, Johnny Johnston, Emil Newman, David Rose, Billy Eckstine, Charlie Parker, J. J. Johnson, Carly Simon, Frank Sinatra and Julie London (included on her 1955 debut album Julie Is Her Name, Vol. 1). The first 10 notes of the song are sometimes “quoted” during jazz solos, especially since Dizzy Gillespie did it during his “Perdido” solo at the famous Massey Hall concert in 1953.

Lyrics

Laura is the face in the misty light
Footsteps that you hear down the hall
The laugh that floats on a summer night
That you can never quite recall

And you see Laura on a train that is passing through
Those eyes how familiar they seem
She gave your very first kiss to you
That was Laura but she’s only a dream

She gave your very first kiss to you
That was Laura but she’s only a dream

Play Jazz Standards!
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